Class 9 History Chapter 1 – French Revolutions

Check out the list of important questions of chapter 1 of history for class 9.  History being the theoretical subject is one of the most scoring subjects. Once a student develops his interest in history, it becomes the maximum scoring subject. NTSE Guru Experts have designed important questions of chapter 1- The French revolution which is most likely to appear in exam. These questions have long and short descriptive answers which make it easy for a student to understand and learn history for the exams. Practice them now.

Important Questions of Class 9 Chapter – The French Revolutions

1.  Who were the members of the first two estates?

Ans. Clergy and Nobility.

2.  What is the National Anthem of France?

Ans. Marseillaise is the National Anthem of France.

3.   What is Subsistence Crisis?

Ans. An extreme situation where the basic means of livelihood are endangered is called subsistence crisis.

4.  What idea did the philosopher John Locke give?

Ans.  John Locke sought to refute the Doctrine of Divine and absolute right of the monarch.

5.   Who was Mirabeau?

Ans.  Mirabeau was born in a noble family but was convinced of the need to do away with a society of feudal privilege.

6.   Who were the Jacobins? What role did they play in making France a republic?

Or

Name the popular political club in France. Who was its leader? 

Ans.    (1)   The Jacobins were the successful Political club that became an important rallying point for

people in France who wished to discuss government policies and plan their own forms of action.

(2)  The members of the Jacobin club belonged mainly to the less prosperous sections of society. They included small shopkeepers, artisans such as shoemakers, pastry cooks, watch-makers, printers, as well as servants and daily-wage workers. Their leader was Maximilian Robespierre.

7.   State any five causes for the empty treasure of France under Louis XVI.

Ans.  Five causes for the empty treasure of France under Louis XVI are:

(1)  Long years of war had drained the financial resources of France.

(2)   High cost of maintenance of immense palace of Versailles and court.

(3)  Under Louis XVI France helped the thirteen American colonies to gain independence.

(4)  War added to a debt.

(5)  Lender began to charge high interest on loans.

8.   What were the immediate results of the outbreak of the French Revolution?

Ans.    (1)  A large number of nobles fled from their homes, many of them migrating to neighbouring countries.

(2)  Faced with the power of his revolting subjects, Louis XVI finally accorded recognition to the National Assembly and accepted the principle that his powers would from now on be checked by a constitution.

(3)  On the night of 4 August 1789, the Assembly passed a decree abolishing the feudal system of obligations and taxes. Members of the clergy too were forced to give up their privileges. Tithes (tax imposed by the Church) were abolished and lands owned by the Church were confiscated. As a result, the government acquired assets worth at least 2 billion livres.

9.   How and when did the women in France get right to vote?

Ans.    (1) The Constitution of 1791 reduced the women to passive citizens in France and the right to

vote is denied. They demanded the right to vote, to be elected to the Assembly and to hold political office.

(2)  In order to discuss and voice their interests women started their own political clubs and newspapers. About sixty womens clubs came up in different French cities. The Society of Revolutionary and Republican Women was the most famous of them.

(3)  Women’s movements for voting rights and equal wages continued two hundred years in many countries of the world. The fight for the vote was carried out through an international suffrage movement during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

(4)  The example of the political activities of French women during the revolutionary years was kept alive as an inspiring memory. It was finally in 1946 that women in France won the right to vote

10.   Describe the role of women in the French Revolution?   

Ans.  In order to discuss and voice their interests women started their own clubs and newspapers.

(1)  About sixty women’s clubs came up in different French cities. The society of Revolutionary and republican women was the most famous of them.

(2)  One of their main demands was that women enjoy the some political rights as men. Women were disappointed that the constitution of 1791 reduced them to passive citizens.

(3)  They demanded the right to vote, to be elected to Assembly and to hold political office. Only then, they felt, would their interests be represented in, the new govt.

(4)  Women’s movements for voting rights and equal wages continued through the next 200 years. It was finally in 1946 that women in France won the right to vote.

11.    How would you explain the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte?

Ans.    (1)  In 1804, Napoleon Bonaparte crowned himself as an emperor of France. He set out to conquer the neighbouring European countries, dispossessing dynasties & creating kingdoms where he placed members of his family.

(2)  He saw his role as a moderniser of Europe. He introduced many laws such as the protection of private property & a uniform system of weights and measures provided by decimal system.

(3)  Initially many saw him as a liberator but soon his armies came to be viewed as an invading force.

(4)  He was finally defeated at Waterloo in 1815.Many of his measures had an impact on people long after Napoleon had left.

12.   Describe the storming of the prison Bastille in France.

Ans.    (1)  On the morning of 14 July 1789, the city of Paris was in a state of alarm. The king had commanded troops to move into the city. Rumours spread that he would soon order the army to open fire upon the citizens who rose in protest due to shortage of bread.

(2)  Some 7,000 men and women gathered in front of the town hall and decided to form peoples’ militia. They broke into a number of government buildings in search of arms. Finally, a group of several hundred people marched towards the eastern part of the city and stormed the fortress-prison, the Bastille, where they hoped to find hoarded ammunition.

(3)  In the armed fight that followed, the commander of the Bastille was killed and the prisoners released. Though there were only seven of them. Yet the Bastille was hated by all, because it stood for the despotic power of the king. The fortress was demolished and its stone fragments were sold in the markets to all those who wished to keep a souvenir of its destruction.

13.   How did France Become a Constitutional Monarchy?

Ans.    (1) Faced with the power of his revolting subjects, Louis XVI finally accorded recognition to the National Assembly and accepted the principle that his powers would from now on be checked by a constitution.

(2)  On the night of 4 August 1789, the Assembly passed a decree abolishing the feudal system of obligations and taxes. Members of the clergy too were forced to give up their privileges. Tithes (tax imposed by the Church) were abolished and lands owned by the Church were confiscated.

(3)  The National Assembly completed the draft of the Constitution in 1791. Its main object was to limit the powers of the monarch. These powers instead of being concentrated in the hands of one person, were now separated and assigned to different institutions, the legislature, executive and judiciary. This made France a constitutional monarchy.

14.   Why is the period from 1793 to 1794 referred to as reign of terror in France?

Ans.    (1)  The period from 1793 to 1794 is referred to as the Reign of Terror because it was a period of severe control and punishment by Robespierre.

(2)  All those whom he saw as being enemies of the republic, ex-nobles and clergy, members of other political parties, even members of his own party who did not agree with his methods were arrested, imprisoned and then tried by a revolutionary tribunal.

(3)  If the court found them guilty they were guillotined.

(4) The guillotine is a device consisting of two poles and a blade with which a person is beheaded. It was named after Dr Guillotine who invented it.

15.   Locate and label the following on the given map

  1. Epicenter f main panic movement in western France
  2. Region of western France that was not affected by the great fear
  3. A port of France related to slave trade
  4. The port of France enriched due to slave trade

Ans.     1. RUFFEC            2. BREST           3. BORDEAUX          4. NANTES

Map

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